Alexandrian school between the middle and the end of 6th century: Olympiodorus, Elias, David

Author(s):  A.M. Bolgova, candidate of Sciences, associate Professor, Belgorod National Research University, Belgorod, Russia, bolgova@bsu.edu.ru

M.A. Rudneva, no, no, Belgorod National Research University, Belgorod, Russia, Rudneva-maria@mail.ru

Issue:  Volume 47, № 1

Rubric:  Topical issues of world history

Annotation:  The Alexandrian school was a kind of synthesis of Christianity and paganism, when pagan teaching material was sought to combine with Christian dogma. The theme of this work is devoted to two philosophers of the Alexandrian Neoplatonic school in the VI century - Elias and David of Alexandria. The article proves, that they belonged to the school of Ammonius, being students of Olympiodorus the Younger, and continued the traditions of ancient Aristotelianism and Neoplatonism in it. Both philosophers lived and worked in the 2nd half of the 6th century. The article proves, that Elias was a scholarch of the school after the death of Olympiodorus (565–590), and David can be identified with the legendary Armenian philosopher David Anakht. David subsequently returned fr om Alexandria to Armenia, wh ere he began to develop neo-Platonic ideas. By religion, both philosophers were Christians, although they accepted the pagan ideas of the Neoplatonists. Regarding David, a conclusion is drawn about the shift of his chronology in the Armenian historical tradition towards aging; more correctly attribute the time of his life to the middle – 2nd half of the VI century.

Keywords:  Elias of Alexandria, David of Alexandria, philosophers of the 6th century, Alexandrian school, Alexandrian Neoplatonism, David Anakht, Olympiodorus the Younger, John Philoponus, Ammonius.

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DOI:  10.18413/2687-0967-2020-47-1-67-77

Reference to article:  Bolgova A.M., Rudneva M.A. 2020. Alexandrian school between the middle and the end of 6th century: Olympiodorus, Elias, David. Via in tempore. History and political science, 47(1): 67–77 (in Russian). DOI